Projects

An often highly anticipated portion of the education is whenever a game project is right around the corner. Three game projects teach students the ins and outs of working in a real production group.

Game projects are one of the absolute highlights of the PlaygroundSquad curriculum. Students are divided into groups where designers, artists, and programmers join forces to develop games of their very own, culminating in a prototype game. To this end, their supervisors assist them in planning and development when requested, but the truth of the matter is that projects at PlaygroundSquad almost run independently by the students themselves.

You can also check out all student game projects made at PlaygroundSquad.Students playing together

Background

Three game projects are part of the education - two during your first year, and one during your second year, right before the internship period. Your knowledge is iterated on and pushed further by cycling between theoretical courses and these more practical game projects, introducing you to more advanced concepts for your specific discipline that you can put into real use.

Process

Starting up

When a game project is about to start, students are split into groups with students from all disciplines - artists, designers, and programmers alike - to form ass-kicking name-taking production teams. The designers in each group draft a number of game concepts as part of their regular curriculum, and the group then chooses one of these concepts to actually create.

Each group is also given a development platform, and thanks to our membership in the academic programme PlayStation First students are also given the opportunity to work on Sony platforms such as PlayStation 4.

Two Artists workingWeek-to-week work

Students manage their project using Scrum, with daily stand-ups every day and planning "micro-sprints" from week to week. At the end of each week every project group has a weekly review with their supervisors - first each discipline with their designated supervisor, then the group as a whole along with all supervisors.

Milestones

There are generally two important milestones during every project:

  1. The halfway presentation, where students "officially" show off their game to each other for the first time.
  2. The final presentation, for which representatives from our board of education are invited along with all current students at PlaygroundSquad.

Postmortem

As every project concludes, students sit down along with a moderating supervisor to determine and analyze what parts of the projects were successful and which were unsuccessful, documenting their findings to learn for future projects.

Publishing

The very best projects may very possibly go on to be published officially on the PlayStation Store thanks to our participation in the PlayStation First programme.